This is the "Home" page of the "COMM 8" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

COMM 8  

Last Updated: Sep 15, 2014 URL: http://cabrillo.libguides.com/content.php?pid=376632 Print Guide RSS Updates
Home Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

Library Module 1

Communication Studies -- Library Module 1

   Finding Journal Articles & Newspaper Articles

Name _________________________________

To get to this page on the Internet

  • Go to the Cabrillo College Library homepage (www.cabrillo.edu/services/library)
  • Under Library Instruction, click on Course-Related Instruction
  • Click on Comm 8 -- Library Module #1 (http://cabrillo.libguides.com/aecontent.php?pid=376632)

 Finding Journal Articles

Thousands upon thousands of journals and magazines are published around the world, covering virtually any topic you can imagine - have you ever heard of Ceramic World Review, or the Journal of College Student Psychotherapy? When researching a topic, journal articles are an excellent source for background information, detailed studies, or simply perspective on your topic. If you can find a few good journal articles written about your topic, you have found a goldmine!

What's the difference between a journal and a magazine? Magazines are generally written for the general public, with writing that is usually non-technical and easy to understand. Journals are typically written for researchers or professionals in a given specialized field. They often contain original research results or surveys of research topics, with writing that is more specialized than found in magazines.

The Cabrillo College Library subscribes to thousands of magazines and journals, very few of which are actually in the Library building itself. Over 90% of the titles we subscribe to can be found in several subscription databases, which are large databases containing either summaries or the complete text of hundreds of thousands of articles.

Let's take a look at one of those databases:

Go to the Library homepage (http://www.cabrillo.edu/services/library/)

Under Find, click on Articles and Databases, on the left side of the screen

You are now looking at a listing of the subscription databases the Library makes available to you. As you can see, these databases cover lots of different topics, and can be used to find journal articles, magazine articles, and much more! Take a few minutes to explore the descriptions of a few of these databases.

Exercise: Write down the names of two databases that might be good places to find information about immigration reform.

Database name:______________________________________________ 

Database name:______________________________________________

OK, let's continue:

Click on the first database, Academic Search Complete (from off-campus, you will need to enter your Cabrillo library card barcode number at this point)

Academic Search Complete includes the text of articles from nearly 9,000 publications, mostly journals, on virtually any academic research topic. As with most search tools, you can simply enter your topic terms and go, or you can take advantage of the search options listed on the search page.

Type in some words to search on, but don't click the Search button yet

Click in the box next to Full Text. This will eliminate any article summaries from your results, so your results will have only articles you can read on your computer screen (or print, etc.)

Click in the box next to Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals. This eliminates articles from any magazines, leaving you only with articles from scholarly journals.

OK, now click the Search button  

The search results screen looks like the search results screens of most search tools (Google search results, for example), with each linked item representing a "hit" on your search. The listings include article title, publication name, date, pages, and other identifying information - usually enough to determine if the article is of interest to you. Since we restricted our search to Full Text articles only, every article listed has a link to the text, either PDF Full Text or HTML Full Text. Articles available in PDF format are basically scanned copies of the pages from the actual publication, nicely formatted and often containing illustrations, ads, and pieces of other articles. Articles in HTML format are simply text pages much like this one, occasionally including illustrations or other material.

Exercise: Find three useful articles on your topic in Academic Search Complete.

Author (if any)___________________________________________ 

Article title______________________________________________ 

_______________________________________________________

Journal title _____________________________________________ 

Article publication date____________________________________

Volume & Issue number (if any)_____________________________

Pages (if listed)__________________________________________ 

Author (if any)___________________________________________ 

Article title______________________________________________ 

_______________________________________________________

Journal title _____________________________________________ 

Article publication date____________________________________

Volume & Issue number (if any)_____________________________

Pages (if listed)__________________________________________ 

Author (if any)___________________________________________ 

Article title______________________________________________ 

_______________________________________________________

Journal title _____________________________________________ 

Article publication date____________________________________

Volume & Issue number (if any)_____________________________

Pages (if listed)__________________________________________  

 Finding Newspaper Articles

Newspapers are published every day in cities across the country and across the world. Newspapers from major cities are excellent sources for information about current events and issues from around the world. In addition, most newspapers, whether published in a large city or a small town, are good places to find information about local events, or events that have a significant impact on the area. The New York Times, for instance, would likely provide detailed stories on the progress of the rebuilding efforts at the World Trade Center site. The Santa Cruz Sentinel, on the other hand, publishes numerous articles on the farming issues affecting Santa Cruz County.

ProQuest Newspapers Database

The Cabrillo library subscribes to an excellent database, ProQuest Newspapers, covering every article from every day's issue from five major U.S. newspapers: the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, and the Christian Science Monitor.

Go to the Library homepage (http://www.cabrillo.edu/services/library/)

Under Find, click on Articles and Databases, on the left side of the screen

Scroll down and click on the News category to display the category databases

Click on ProQuest Newspapers

In the search box, type some words on a topic of interest

Click on the drop-down box next to Date Range and select Last 3 months

Click the Search button

Exercise: Find three useful newspaper articles on your topic in ProQuest Newspapers.

Author (if any)___________________________________________ 

Article title______________________________________________ 

_______________________________________________________

Newspaper name_________________________________________ 

Article publication date____________________________________

Pages (if listed)_________________________________________ 

Author (if any)___________________________________________ 

Article title______________________________________________ 

_______________________________________________________

Newspaper name_________________________________________ 

Article publication date____________________________________

Pages (if listed)__________________________________________ 

Author (if any)___________________________________________ 

Article title______________________________________________ 

_______________________________________________________

Newspaper name_________________________________________ 

Article publication date____________________________________

Pages (if listed)__________________________________________  

 

Newspaper Websites

Most newspapers also provide a website with an electronic version of their paper, sometimes including additional information not available in the print edicition. Finding these newspaper websites is a good way to locate stories from outside the U.S. Of course, not all newspapers are published in English, or in any other language you might be able to read!

Finding information published somewhere other than where you live is also an excellent way to discover different perspectives on issues, often very different from what our local or even national newspapers provide.

You can often easily find newspapers from a specific country by searching the country name and the world "newspapers" in a search engine (e.g., Ireland newspapers). Alternately, you can use one of the many websites that collect links to hundreds of news sources around the world. OnlineNewspapers.com is one such website.

Go to www.onlinenewspapers.com

Click on a geographic area (not the U.S.), then click on a specific country

From the resulting list of newspapers, explore and read a few articles in two or three of the listed newspapers.

Exercise: Find three articles from newspapers outside the U.S. that cover a familiar topic but from a different perspective, or articles that cover interesting local issues.

Author (if any)___________________________________________ 

Article title______________________________________________ 

_______________________________________________________

Newspaper name_________________________________________ 

Article publication date____________________________________

Volume number (if any)___________________________________

Pages (if listed)_________________________________________ 

Author (if any)___________________________________________ 

Article title______________________________________________ 

_______________________________________________________

Newspaper name_________________________________________ 

Article publication date____________________________________

Volume number (if any)___________________________________

Pages (if listed)__________________________________________ 

Author (if any)___________________________________________ 

Article title______________________________________________ 

_______________________________________________________

Newspaper name_________________________________________ 

Article publication date____________________________________

Volume number (if any)___________________________________

Pages (if listed)__________________________________________  

 Citing Your Sources

When investigating a topic for a research pape, you will hopefully find a number of good books, websites, and journal or newspaper articles. These sources should be included at the end of your research paper, as a References, or Works Cited, list. Including your sources enables your instructor, or anyone else reading your research, to identify and track down the sources you used, if they wish to.

Works cited lists are always written in a consistent pattern, following guidelines created by the Modern Language Association (MLA), the American Psychological Association (APA), or some other editorial organization. For this exercise, we will be using the APA guidelines. The complete guidelines are quite lengthy and detailed, but we have listed below some of the more common items.

APA citation pattern for a journal or magazine from a subscription database:

Author last name, author initials (publication date or year in parenthesis). Article title. Journal name, volume (issue number in parenthesis), page range. Retrieved month day, year, from database name database.

Cowan, N (2003). Looking for luck in all the wrong places. Journal of Mathematics, 78, 445-487. Retrieved July 24, 2006, from Academic Search Premier database.

APA citation pattern for a newspaper article from a subscription database:

Author last name, author initials (publication year, date in parenthesis). Article title (note: if no author, begin entry with article title, followed by parenthetical publication date). Newspaper name, page range. Retrieved month day, year, from database name database.

Strawberry crop expanding across the state (2006, June 27). Los Angeles Times, B4. Retrieved July 24, 2006, from ProQuest Newspapers database.

APA citation pattern for a newspaper article from a newspaper website:

Author last name, author initials (publication year, date in parenthesis). Article title (note: if no author, begin entry with article title, followed by parenthetical publication date) [Electronic version]. Newspaper name, page range.

Safire, W. (2005, May 2). What's in a word? [Electronic version]. Washington Post, C5.

As you can see in the above examples, you don't need to include a piece of information (e.g., author) if it is not listed in your source. Also, when listing items with more than one author, reverse the order of all of the names (e.g., Sweeney, E., Kovacs, E., Sandino, A.).

Exercise: List four of the sources you located earlier, using the APA style guidelines described above.

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

 

Congratulations! You have completed Module 1. Remember to turn it in by the due date.


G. Romero & L. Joakimides; rev. 9/2012

Description

Loading  Loading...

Tip